Guidelines for Approval of Eagle Scout Projects

BSA Troop 401 - Steubenville, Ohio


Approval of the Eagle Scout Leadership project is a process. Scouts should be aware that it is not uncommon for the approval/planning portion of the project to take as long as six months. Several iterations of proposal review at the Troop Committee and District Committee will be common. Scouts should also be aware that the Troop adult leadership places value on the scout's performance in the Troop when assessing whether a scout is ready to move on to the Eagle Rank. A scout's attendance at Troop meetings and outings, for example, is an indicator of their Scout Spirit. Some scouts may need to mature in scout competence before they are ready to advance to this prestigious rank. Normally, if a scout is active in the Troop, is at ease with all scouting skills and is competent in Troop leadership, he would be ready to pursue the trail to Eagle.

Upon completion of the Life Rank, those scouts desiring to pursue the Eagle Rank should begin thinking about their Eagle scout leadership project. During this time the scout is encouraged to discuss his ideas with the Scoutmaster or other Troop leaders. Responses will help to bring projects into focus as this dialog takes place. There are aides for the scout to use, many of which are now found on the internet. The following web locations are a sampling of sites which the scout will find useful on his trail to eagle:

Leadership Service Projects

The 12 Steps from Life to Eagle

Finding an Eagle Service Project

Eagle Scout Leadership Service Project Workbook (PDF format)

Eagle Scout Rank Application

When the scout has settled on a project, he will discuss it with the Scoutmaster for preliminary approval.

Once an idea is approved by the Scoutmaster, the scout will develop the project proposal in more detail. Normally this draft should be presented to the Scoutmaster at least three weeks prior to the Troop Committee meeting at which the scout wishes to present his proposal. This will give the Scoutmaster time to review the draft and discuss revisions before presentation to the Troop Committee.

The scout will need to secure a note or letter from the benefitting organization or group indicating that the project was discussed with them and that they are supportive of the project. The scout will prepare either a handwritten or typewritten project proposal and mail one copy to each Troop Committee member at least one week prior to the Troop Committee Meeting with a cover note to the Troop Committee Chairman requesting to be put on the meeting agenda. The scout will complete the cover page (page 3), "Project Description" sheet (page 7) and "Project Details" sheet (page 8) of the Eagle Scout Leadership Service Project Workbook for this submittal and should include attachments which will help the committee members understand the project. The attachments should include photographs, a detailed schedule which outlines dates and manhours and a detailed budget which details all project costs and how these costs will be funded and by what source(s). The workbook and attachments submitted should be photocopies at this point. The scout should be aware that this stage of the process may take a few months.

The scout should prepare a formal presentation for the Troop Committee Meeting lasting no longer than 15 minutes. Parents and relatives of the presenting scout shall absent themselves from the meeting during this process. The Troop Committee will then spend no more than an additional 15 minutes reviewing the document and presentation. During the review the scout with be asked to leave the room to facilitate discussion by the Troop Committee. The Troop Committee will develop a consensus of review comments and determine what action to take. The scout will then be called back into the meeting room and the action, comments and required revisions (if needed) will be presented to the scout by the Troop Committee Chairman or his designee.

The Troop Committee will act in one of four ways

    1. Approved
    2. Approved with minor revisions
    3. Not approved subject to revisions
    4. Not approved

A. Approved

The scout will then prepare the Eagle Scout Workbook in typewritten form. Then obtain the approving signatures of the benefitting organization's representative, the Scoutmaster and the designated Troop Committee member for signature of the original workbook document. Upon approval, it is the scout's responsibility to contact the District Advancement Chairman to schedule his presentation to the District Advancement Committee. Scouts are advised and should plan for this part of the process to take several months.

B. Approved with Minor Revisions

The scout will write down the revisions needed and prepare a revised Eagle Scout Workbook in typewritten form and meet with the designated Troop Committee member for signature of the original workbook document. Then the scout will obtain the approving signatures of the benefitting organization's representative and the Scoutmaster for signature of the original workbook document. Upon approval, it is the scout's responsibility to contact the District Advancement Chairman to schedule his presentation to the District Advancement Committee. Scouts are advised and should plan for this part of the process to take a few months.

C. Not Approved Subject to Revisions

The scout will be encouraged to write down the revisions needed in order to obtain approval. A member of the Troop Committee will prepare a written memo to the scout outlining the revisions needed for approval within one week of the meeting. The scout will then make the revisions and then mail one copy to each Troop Committee member at least one week prior to the Troop Committee Meeting with a cover note to the Troop Committee Chairman requesting to be put on the meeting agenda.

D. Not Approved

It will be rare that a project will not eventually be approved. Once a project idea has been approved by the Scoutmaster, it will be unlikely that the Troop Committee will reject a scout's project.


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